Showcase Your Passion – with University of Liverpool’s Cheerleading Society.

Women are amazing, that’s just a fact. To showcase this, we wanted to give you an insight into a collaborative campaign we ran with a predominantly female society – The University of Liverpool’s Cheerleaders. The society paired up with Adobe and their friends, the ‘Creative Rebels’, who presented workshops on how to ‘Showcase your passion’.

The Adobe ‘Creative Rebels’ talks were created to promote two main products – Lightroom and Rush, in a way that would benefit and inspire students across the country.  These presentations were structured to emphasise that students should live life to the fullest, and embrace their creative side. The campaign ran over 8 universities, and we worked with 40 student societies and 20 brand ambassadors to make it happen. Amy Hughes, from the University of Liverpool’s Cheerleading society, was kind enough to talk us through her experience of the collaboration.

HYPE: Hi Amy, thanks for taking the time to talk to me about your society’s collaboration with Adobe on their ‘creative rebels’ campaign. Could you tell me a bit about yourself?

AMY: I’ve just graduated from the University of Liverpool with a Geography degree, and I’m about to go back to do an MA in Sport business and management!

HYPE: Tell us about your society and what it’s like to be involved with it?

AMY: As a club we hold 13 sessions a week but I train in 3 of those as we split them between the different teams.

HYPE: How did you get involved with Hype Collective and Adobe?

AMY: One of Hype’s employees contacted me via Linked in. I’m a super enthusiastic person, so I jumped at the chance to get involved in this opportunity. I also consider myself a very creative person, so when I was approached to work for and with the Creative Rebels and Adobe, I thought, brilliant, this sounds amazing!

HYPE: Glad to hear your enthusiasm for what we do! What did the collaboration entail and what was the experience like?

AMY: The collaboration entailed the Creative Rebels coming to Liverpool University, and giving a talk on how to ‘Showcase your passion’ and follow your dreams. They also talked about how life isn’t just about your course, there’s more to life than just going down a monotonous and structured career path.

 The experience was brilliant because I felt like I gained a lot from the talk. Being a creative person studying geography, I felt my options post university were quite narrow, but the talk inspired the whole society to live life to the fullest! It brought us all together, because we could empathise with each other on how hard we work for our degrees. We also bonded over mutual creative hobbies, like art and photography, which we tend to push to the side when we get busy. Finally, we were offered a sponsorship opportunity.

HYPE: What’s your advice to societies who want to get involved with Hype?

AMY: My advice would be get involved, and get as many members involved as possible! It has an insane amount of benefits, it can open the floor to great conversations, and be a great way to socialise. It’s also a great way to increase club and society funds through the sponsorship opportunities Hype Collective offers.

HYPE: Amazing stuff. Finally, could you describe your society and its members in three words?

AMY: Inclusive, hard-working and friendly!

What were the results of this campaign?

The tour got an average of 78 students attending each event held nationally, which smashed our KPI of 40 by a whopping 95%. It was also a massive improvement on previous events held by Adobe.

Additionally, there was a 33% conversion rate on getting students to download and install Lightroom and/or Rush, the two products the campaign was designed to promote.

If you’re a university society and interested in working with brands to bring great benefits to your members, please contact us at Hype Collective so we can work with you. You want to talk to Helene Bentsen: helene@hypecollective.co.uk

More Stories
Dr John Larsen welcomes positive trends revealed by The Alcohol Issue